The Little Prince: No Spoiler Review

Directed by Mark Osborne and written by Irena Brignull and Bob Persichetti comes the movie adaptation of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s iconic masterpiece, The Little Prince. The story is about a little girl, whose childhood is taken away in preparation for the grown-up world; a world which, as anyone should know, no one doesn’t have to get into at such a young age.

As her mother neatly and meticulously organizes the little girl’s life plan from childhood into adulthood, she discovers their odd yet kind neighbor, the Aviator, who always interrupts the scheduled and timely order of the grown-up world. The two begin a friendship with its foundation coming from the Aviator’s own written records about the Little Prince, who helps the little girl rediscover the childhood she once ignored.

The movie doesn’t veer away from the book–as a matter of fact it embraces the book’s wonderful themes and does even more. It makes its own spin on the book by focusing the narrative on the little girl’s encounters with the Little Prince and how his story literally changes her life and viewpoint on the world around her. The separation from reality and fiction is a blur, and only continues to blur as the film goes on, as if to symbolize the little girl embracing her childhood and wild imagination.

The Little Prince is charming and layered; while there are certainly some themes and symbolism that would need a careful dissection to understand, it doesn’t take too much thinking to enjoy the film. Just like Antoine’s book, The Little Prince is a kid’s movie written for grown-ups.

Animation is lovely: the sequences that describe the Little Prince’s story was what got me to watch the film in the first place. Those sequences gave the film a paper-mache-like texture and reminded me of my stopmotion LEGO videos back when I was much younger.

One thing I would like to take home from the movie is the sense of wonder and amazement at everything one sees during their childhood…that a child does not merely look at an object, but looks deep within it to find the one thing that makes it special. A man may have wrinkles and look old, but as long as one’s heart remains to beat the same as when they were young, he would never grow old.

8.5/10

 

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2 comments

  1. Samantha Issa Adalia · October 26

    “One thing I would like to take home from the movie is the sense of wonder and amazement at everything one sees during their childhood…that a child does not merely look at an object, but looks deep within it to find the one thing that makes it special.” Amen brother! Took the words right out of my mouth. It would do well for us to keep waking up that wonder no matter how old we get – and the movie does make a good reminder for that.
    I also like how you mentioned your LEGO videos – it seems as if the movie makes the each of us recall a unique childhood memory, no? Keep up the writing – it’s like there’s always a part in each of your reviews that connects with me – keep enlightening us haha.

    Liked by 1 person

    • samwastaken · October 26

      Thank you so much Sam!!!! You’ve always followed everything I did hehe thanks for the support!

      Like

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